Event: Nov 28, 2017



Recording

This presentation was designed to support anyone newly diagnosed with MS in managing the emotional and psychological impact of their diagnosis. Traditional models of illness adjustment tend to emphasize ways to cope with loss and manage a decline in functioning. Instead, Michelle focuses on re-framing this understandable adjustment as an ongoing transition to a “new normal”. She offers information, strategies and tips that will encourage participants to find ways to live along-side their MS diagnosis instead of allowing it to hijack their identity. Related issues such as self-care, the impact of having MS on relationships, and support for care-givers will also be addressed.
 
This session is hosted by the Multiple Sclerosis Society of Canada, BC & Yukon Division.  We gratefully acknowledge the support of Sanofi Genzyme who provided an education grant which makes this webinar, Making Sense of a New Diagnosis: MS 101 for the Newly Diagnosed, possible.
 
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Presenter(s):

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Michelle Srdanovic, M.A., R.C.C. 
 

Michelle Srdanovic is a Registered Clinical Counsellor with a Master’s Degree in Counselling Psychology from Simon Fraser University. Over the last 15 years, she has worked with families, couples and children using cognitive behavioural, emotion-focused and narrative therapeutic practices. In addition, Michelle has provided community education on the topics of social-emotional regulation, trauma, self-harm and anxiety. Currently, she works as a therapist in private counselling practice in New Westminster and provides clinical supervision to graduate students and other therapists. She is also part-time faculty at BCIT and continues to teach and develop coursework in the Department of Basic Health Sciences. Ironically, one of the topics Michelle teaches to health care provides is how patients adjust to chronic illness. She was diagnosed with MS in September 2013 and considers herself on a lifelong journey of making meaning out of her diagnosis.